Posts Tagged ‘Homeschoolers’

May 2009
06

Valentine’s Day for the Homeschool: Valentine’s Day Card Ideas

Mimi Rothschild asked: It’s always tempting for young homeschoolers to rush to the store and buy overpriced mass-produced valentines featuring their favorite toys and cartoons....
Mimi Rothschild asked:


It’s always tempting for young homeschoolers to rush to the store and buy overpriced mass-produced valentines featuring their favorite toys and cartoons. Homeschool parents should try to curb this desire by encouraging their children to make their own cards. It is a fun hands-on activity that you can do together as a family. Encourage them to use their imagination to create an interesting personalized style.

Cards are a breeze to make, even for younger homeschool students. Just take a piece of red, white, or pink construction paper and fold it in half. Then, you can decorate the card using glitter, sequins, crayons, more construction paper, and other craft materials. Cut out little hearts and decorate the front of your cards. Use fabric patterns and wrapping paper for a neat effect. Cut your card into interesting shapes like hearts or flowers or animals.

Have your children make collage valentines. Grab a stack of magazines and have them cut out clippings of words and pictures that evoke the Valentine’s Day spirit. Use stamps, stencils, and clip art to jazz things up. You can even create a little pocket in your card for a treat like a Hershey’s Kiss.

Make sure to include a Bible verse about love. This will help your students to keep their idea of love in perspective. After all, there’s a lot more to love than romance, flings, and crushes. These valentines should be about friendship and brotherly love. Check out these Bible verses about love.

Once the cards are made you can do several things to make the card-giving process fun. If you belong to a homeschool co-op, you can have all of the homeschoolers create their own valentine mailboxes out of old shoeboxes. Decorate them in a similar fashion. You can slip valentines in balloons and then inflate them. Students will have to pop their balloon in order to get their valentine.



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Apr 2009
27

Autumnal Crafts

Posted: April 27th, 2009 | Author: admin | Categories: Homeschooling | Tags: , , , , , ,
Mimi Rothschild asked: Some people associate autumn with the “death” of summer. I see it as a gorgeous, vibrant, colorful time where fiery reds, oranges,...
Mimi Rothschild asked:


Some people associate autumn with the “death” of summer. I see it as a gorgeous, vibrant, colorful time where fiery reds, oranges, and yellows compete for our attention. Crisp wind lively plays among the fallen leaves. Warm cocoa and crackling fires chase away the cold at night. Fall is my favorite season, can you tell? Thanksgiving is a great time for homeschoolers to dust off the old craft supplies. Although the traditional turkey hand tracing can be loads of fun, there’s so much more fun to be had. Why not try a turkey greeter or bouquet of thanks? There’s tons of fun autumnal crafts begging to be made at Kaboose. Click around to find them.

Thanksgiving List

It might seem obvious, but the main objective this Thanksgiving season should be to actually give thanks. It’s sad how distracting our lives can be, that we forget to remember how blessed we are. There are many ways to show gratitude to our Lord and Savior this season. You can spread paper across any surface, a table, refrigerator, or wall. Then, equip your homeschoolers with crayons. Each day, have them add something for which they are thankful to the list. On Thanksgiving, you can have each child read his or her contributions aloud in order to share them with the rest of the homeschool family. You can cut out leaves in construction paper instead of writing on a list or draw pictures instead of writing out words. Be creative!

Leafy Fun

For most families, fall means leaf-raking time. Have your homeschoolers help out with the lawn care this year by making it family endeavor. Let them run around and jump in the leaves. At night, you can even burn up the leaves in a brilliant bonfire. Don’t forget to bring the hot cider and hot chocolate!

Family Football

For a lot of dads, Thanksgiving is a time to settle down in the living room and stretch out for a few hours of quality football. Don’t just watch football this year. Get outside and get that blood pumping! It will be a great opportunity to throw the pigskin around with your family. You can even plan for a halftime mini-game, inviting other homeschooling families in the neighborhood.

Play a Thanksgiving Party Game

Think about ways to attribute Thanksgiving imagery to existing games. Consider Mayflower Memory:

Everyone sits in a circle. The first player says, “I am sailing on the Mayflower and I am taking Apples. The next player repeats the phrase, only instead of apples, thinks of something that begins with the letter “B”. The game continues this way until players can no longer think of words. If a player can’t contribute an item, he or she must leave the circle. The last person in the circle wins!

Use your imagination! Give Duck Duck Turkey a try!



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Apr 2009
22

Methods To Use In Homeschooling

Kenneth Scott asked: There are a variety of methods that can be applied in the area of homeschooling. The method you select will have an...
Kenneth Scott asked:


There are a variety of methods that can be applied in the area of homeschooling. The method you select will have an impact on the curriculum and style of teaching. The following are some of the most popular homeschooling methods.

The Charlotte Mason method is named after Charlotte Mason, who is known as the originator of the homeschooling movement. She herself was a homeschooler, and she wanted to establish a basic plan for a complete and effective homeschooling program. The Charlotte Mason method emphasizes poetry, fine arts, classical music, crafts, and classical literature.

This method is designed to encourage an awareness of literature and involves reading to the child every day. The child is then asked to tell what he or she has heard. This starts at the age of six. By the age of ten, the child is expected to write narrations in a book. Mason encouraged the use of nature diaries as well. The child writes observations of nature in the book as well. This creates a sense of respect for the environment in the child. Mason thought that good hehavior and character were critical for a childs complete personality development.

The Eclectic Homeschooling method is a combination of several techniques. Innovative parents rely on their own judgment to select topics that make up the curriculum for their own child. These parents are always looking for the best products they can find to help them meet the needs of their homeschoolers.

Many of the curricula in this method are improvised. This means that, while the basic curriculum is established, parents change it to adapt to the individual needs and interests of their children. The curriculum is generally established according to the temperament, learning style, and interests of the children. These programs typically include visits to libraries, factories, and museums.

John Holt, a public educator in Boston, developed the unschooling method. Holt believed that children learn best when they learn at their own pace and are guided by their own interests. He wanted to unschool the child by requiring parents to take their cues from the children. This approach has no set curriculum, schedules, or materials. It is the most unstructured of the homeschooling techniques.

The Montessori method had its start in Italy. It was found that children go through extremely sensitive periods in which they experience periods of intense concentration. In these phases, children will repeat an action until they receive some measure of self-satisfaction from it.

This method relies on prepared environments to facilitate learning. All materials utilized in this method are meant to satisfy the childs interior desire for spiritual development. Materials for this method range from simple to complex, and they are relatively costly.

Whatever method is selected, the underlying concept is flexibility and a strong interest in the childs own desires. The key is to use childrens desire for knowledge to further their education.



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